COMMUNICATIONS (Historic Information)

WASHINGTON-ALASKA MILITARY TELEGRAPH SYSTEM

The United States Signal Corps operates all telegraph lines in Alaska, except certain private wireless plants which connect with the government lines. All business to and from '' outside'' is handled by the commercial lines at Seattle.

During the summer months communication is kept up with radio stations maintained by the various companies engaged in fisheries. The system comprises 2,676 statute miles of submarine cables and 799 statute miles of telegraph lines.

TELEPHONE SERVICE

Telephone connection is open to the public between all stations on the U. S.- Government R. R.

Fairbanks local service includes all creeks in the district. , There is 'phone service between Hot Springs, Rampart and Tofty.

NAVAL COMMUNICATION SERVICE

There are at present nine naval radio stations in Alaska, namely: St. Paul, St. George, Dutch Harbor, Kodiak, Seward, Cordova, Sitka, Juneau, and Ketchikan.

TELEPHONE SERVICE

Telephone connection is open to the public between all stations on the U. S.- Government R. R.

Fairbanks local service includes all creeks in the district. There is 'phone service between Hot Springs, Rampart and Tofty.

NAVAL COMMUNICATION SERVICE

There are at present nine naval radio stations in Alaska, namely: St. Paul, St. George, Dutch Harbor, Kodiak, Seward, Cordova, Sitka, Juneau, and Ketchikan.

The naval communication service handles commercial traffic to any and all points that are served by the radio stations. The rates have been made the same for both the cable and radio. This uniformity of rates makes it very easy to route the traffic via radio in case of a cable break or by cable in case of a radio breakdown.

In general the Alaska stations handle mainly commercial traffic and government traffic of Class B. All commercial traffic is domestic count, 10-word minimum. The rates for southeastern Alaska, such as Juneau, Ketchikan, and Sitka, are 10 cents a word, 10-word minimum.

For Cordova and Seward the rate is 15 cents a word, 10-word minimum. For southwestern Alaska, such as Kodiak, Dutch Harbor, and the Pribilofs, the rate is 19 cents a word, io-word minimum.

At present all traffic for points east of the 138th meridian is routed through the Astoria-Ketchikan circuit. This is the old Marconi spark circuit. All traffic to points west of this meridian is routed via the Keyport-Cordova arc circuit.

All the Alaska stations are spark stations except that Cordova and St. Paul have both arc and spark installations.

Hydraulic Operations

Agriculture at Fairbanks, Alaska

Kodiak Bear

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